drink my partner’s semen/breast milk/urine
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Can I drink my partner’s semen/breast milk/urine?

We get a lot of questions from our readers who want to know if it is safe for them to drink semen of their partner or other body fluids such as urine or even breast milk. Let’s find out answers to all these questions in this article.

These practices may feel repulsive and disgusting to some but to those for whom it works, these can be a focal point of sexual pleasure. But what makes them so? How safe are these practices? A deeper understanding of these nuances is crucial for making an informed choice about whether or not this can be a right fit for you. 

Both say yes, then you do! 

Before one jumps onto drinking or consuming any body fluid, it is important to reiterate that one of the most important elements of a healthy and happy sexual activity is consent. Both the partners have to consent to doing these activities. If even one partner is not ready or is hesitant in doing any such activity, the other partner should not force him/her for the same and respect their decision. 

Precum and vaginal fluids

The clear liquid secreted from a man’s penis for the purpose of lubrication is commonly ingested during oral sex. The same is true for vaginal fluids secreted during foreplay or as a precursor to penetrative sex. However, unless you’re sure about each other’s sexual history and health, this can put you at a risk of STIs and STDs. If however you are sure of their sexual health then pre-cum and vaginal fluids are harmless. Even so, once done with the sexual act, we recommend giving your mouth a good rinse and a brush to avoid any unintended infections. 

Semen

Semen is a body fluid so if a person has some sexually transmitted diseases and infection,  it can also have the same infection, including HIV. Hence drinking/swallowing semen is considered a form of unprotected sex and can also put you at risk for an STI and bacterial infections, like gonorrhoea and chlamydia

A person infected with Herpes, a type of infection that affects the skin, can also pass the infection to its partner via semen consumption. 

However, as long as both partners don’t have a history of STIs and are tested for it recently, do not have sex with multiple partners, and consent to it, drinking semen is not unsafe. 

Apart from some protein, semen contains components such as zinc chloride, sodium citrate, lactic acid, calcium, magnesium and potassium, besides hormones estrone, endorphins, prolactin, serotonin and oxytocin, which can actually be healthy if consumed. 

Some people can also be allergic to semen. This allergy is known as seminal plasma hypersensitivity. 

Breast Milk

With regard to breastmilk, it really boils down to what makes the lactating woman comfortable. Breastmilk can extend the same health benefits to your partner as it does to your baby. This practice can be helpful for lactating mothers too, both in getting rid of excess milk build up that can lead to painful engorgement and blocking of ducts as well as increasing milk supply through more frequent consumption. Besides, if your child has taken preference to one breast, your partner’s role in draining the other can be more satisfying and pleasurable than using a pump. 

Other than these practical benefits, it also helps promote intimacy and makes the non-lactating partner feel more involved in the breastfeeding process that is typically a binary arrangement linking a mother and her child. 

You can indulge your partner in breastfeeding as much as you both like as long as you’re not dealing with concerns such as painful blockages, sore nipples (those teeth can make them worse) or Mastitis (an inflammation of breast tissue caused by an infection). 

Urine 

This does come with its share of risks. Contrary to popular perception, urine is not sterile. It can contain bacterial contamination and is high in sodium, urea, creatinine and potassium – all of which can place stress on the kidneys if the person consuming it is not duly hydrated. Besides, if a person is on certain medication or drugs, their urine can contain traces of these chemicals, which may not be safe for the one consuming it. 

All in all, consuming something that has been flushed out by the body – be it yours or your partner’s – isn’t exactly safe. 

Golden showers

The concept of urophilia, however, isn’t just limited to urine consumption. In fact, more commonly it involves urinating on oneself or partner – referred to as golden showers or piss play. 

Golden showers are safe, by and large, and can heighten the sexual arousal as well as orgasms among those who find the act pleasurable; but please take a shower after the act. 

Menstrual Blood 

While the smell of menstrual blood can be a big turn on for many, the decision to consume it must not be taken lightly because it is not quite the same as the blood running through our bodies. Period blood comprises endometrial lining, coagulating elements and vaginal secretions as well as bacteria that build up in the cervix and vagina due to the moist environment during that time. 

Oral consumption of menstrual blood can lead to blood borne pathogens (for example infectious bacteria or virus) transferring into your body. Even if sexual partners want to engage in oral sex during this time, it’s best to use protection such as dental dams. 

The long and short of it is that as far as fluid bonding goes, it’s best to keep menstrual blood out of it. 

Faeces /Poop/ Excreta 

Excreta is riddled with bacteria such as Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter and E. coli, all of which can make you sick, leading to symptoms such as diarrhoea, vomiting, nausea and fever. It can also put one at the risk of transmission of parasites and viruses like hepatitis A and E. 

That’s why optimal cleanliness and use of barriers like dental dams or condoms is recommended even for the practice of annilingus (performing oral stimulation on the anal opening). 

In conclusion 

Many of these practices can help people own their sexuality by shedding inhibitions by looking beyond taboos and fetish-shaming. As long as your pursuit of carnal pleasure doesn’t post risks to your health and safety, do whatever floats your boat without guilt or shame. But ALWAYS prioritise your safety and your partner’s consent.

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